Good Tidings Foundation: Bringing Back the Arts

good_tidings

Art is a powerful tool. It allows anyone to express themselves, free from the constrictions of right and wrong. For children, art can have a tremendous impact, often helping them find their voice and communicate their feelings. It helps foster creativity, imagination and critical thinking, tools that are fundamental to success in today’s world. And unlike other activities, such as music or athletics, art requires few resources, allowing anyone to participate, no matter what their background or income-level may be.

Yet despite this clear understanding of the power and benefits of art, Art Education seems to have been pushed aside in many school curriculums. Currently, only 11% of public schools in California are actually meeting the state’s goals for arts instruction. Constant budget cuts have forced many schools to reduce or eliminate art education entirely, leaving many children with little to no access to a proper arts program.

Our latest partner, Good Tidings Foundation, is working to change this trend and bring the arts back into these children’s lives. They provide free arts education to over 600 underserved 4th-8th graders each month whose schools no longer support it. Good Tidings works directly with the local schools to cover all the costs, including transportation, art supplies and high-level instruction. Their field trips integrate the student’s school curriculum with visual art projects, allowing the students to think about topics such as history and science, from a different perspective. This level of immersive arts education results in a higher-level of comprehensive learning, while providing an effective outlet for their creativity.

Check out Good Tidings Foundation’s Impact Page to learn more and please show your support by sharing their work with your friends!

http://karmastore.org/i/goodtidings

The 2013 Stadium Stampede

Good Tidings is also looking for more participants in their 2013 Stadium Stampede. This annual fundraising event, held on Saturday, April 27th, is your only chance to experience a full ballpark climb at the famous AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants! Participants of all ages can join 3x Olympic Gold Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings and walk, jog or run two laps of the stadium’s lower-level stairs, flat concourse or the full ballpark. All the money raised from this event goes to directly support the great work of Good Tidings Foundation as they continue to help Bay Area’s underserved youth.

To learn more about this awesome event and how to register, check out the link below:

http://support.goodtidings.org/

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Why Millennials Give and Three Big Takeaways

This week, the 2012 Millennial Impact Report, a survey of over 6,500 people ages 20-35 conducted by Achieve and Johnson, Grossnickle, and Associates, was published showing a lot of promising trends. Probably the biggest finding of the survey was that despite the US being in recession and unemployment being a major issue for young people, 75% of millennials donated in 2011.

Although the majority of these donations were $100 or less, the typical millennial donated to five organizations in 2011, and 87% said they expect to support at least the same amount in 2012. This is very exciting news, as it proves that young people want to get involved and donate. Now it is up to the nonprofits to make sure they inspire millennials to give.

Here are three of the biggest takeaways from the report:

1.)  Over 77% of millennials said they have smartphones.

On top of that, 65% still say the website is their preferred method of learning about nonprofits. These two figures emphasize the increasing importance of a strong smartphone presence for all nonprofits.

This doesn’t necessarily mean your nonprofit needs to spend loads of money to build a mobile app. It simply means that your website should still look presentable on all devices. There is a good chance that most young donors first exposure to your nonprofit will be through their phone, so why risk putting them off because your website looks cluttered on the small-screen?

2.)  42% of millennials gave to what inspires them in the moment

The two key pieces to this statement are inspires and in the moment. Millennials want to be inspired, they want to change the world and solve major problems. It is your job as a nonprofit to light that fire within them.

The other important factor is that millennials donate “in the moment.” This doesn’t mean that they donate at random or haphazardly. Instead it implies that you only have a small window to capture their attention, so you need to make your call-to-action as clear and easy as possible. You don’t want to lose that inspired feeling because your donation button was difficult to find.

3.)  Their biggest pet peeve was not knowing how their gift will make a difference

Be clear in how their donation will be used. Donors want to feel a personal connection to the nonprofit, and more importantly, want to feel that their money is not being wasted. By providing a clear explanation of how their donation will make a difference, you are allowing the donor to feel the benefits of giving and inspiring them to share this feeling with others.

Be sure to check out the full report here.

What inspires you to give? How do your giving habits relate to these findings?


How an Unconventional Charity Hopes to Raise $2-billion


Scott Harrison, founder of Charity:Water

Is it possible for a single charity to raise $2 billion in a single decade?

Although this may seem like an impossible goal for most charities, Scott Harrison, founder of charity:water believes that this ambitious goal is more than possible. The Chronicle of Philanthropy recently interviewed Harrison on the success of charity:water and what it will take for his charity to reach its goal of $2 billion.

The most interesting takeaway from the interview is Harrison’s “secrets to his organization’s success”:

  • Demonstrate results
  • Good design and branding
  • Not charging donors for overhead
  • Broadcast your failures
  • “You are what you eat”

Although many charities probably won’t be able to emulate all of charity:water’s values, implementing a couple still can help your nonprofit achieve major results. With the social media space quickly making the shift to a more visual space (Pinterest, Facebook Timeline, etc.), a well designed website and brand can make a huge difference in donors’ minds. Donors want a simple and clean experience, which is something many nonprofits’ current websites do not offer.

The other main element donors want from a nonprofit is results. They want to know where their money is going and how your work is progressing. And even if you make a mistake or hit a road bump along the way, let the donor know. As long as they are truthful results, most donors will be happy (Just don’t make a habit of making mistakes with their money).

Is raising $2 billion in ten years a feasible goal for charity:water? What do you think they doing right and what are they doing wrong?